What is the meaning of curriculum? and what are the examples of curriculum?



Answers:
it is what the teachers teach Source(s):
www.a729.piczo.com The concept of curriculum can be perceived as a connective link between teacher and student, organized in such a way to achieve goals previously set by the teacher, the learning organization or by the curriculum specialists.

The above definition, of course, does not cover all the meanings of curriculum, especialy when we think of them in a variety of contexts and situations where different goals and objectives need to be persued.

Then, in some situations the curriculum is used to correctly diagnose learning problems and restore connections between the teacher and the learner, while in other situations it can be conceived as a framework that provides external settings for the learning process.

However, the definitions above do not translate all the aspects involving curriculum and its interaction with the teaching and learning community.

I advocate the definition of curriculum that suports a complex network of physical, social and intellectual conditions that shape and reinforce the behavior of individuals, and takes in consideration the individual's perceptions and interpretations of the environment in order to reinforce the learning objectives and to facilitate the evaluation procedures.

Considering this point of view, the process of decision-making in updating the curriculum will be supported by a platform of shared values, images and beliefs, that will be crutial in the organization process of the intended and planned learning.

The expressed, implied, and emergent dimensions of curriculum need to work together in order to provide the curriculum specialists with the unstated and unplanned activities, unintended learning occured in class, learner's perceptions of certain conditions, positive and negative effects on the learner, gaps between learners, uniqueness of individual learners, and so many other clues, in order to incorporate changes in the curriculum that will reduce failures.

This continuing adjusting process is needed if we remember that alterations in a learning environment are experimental in nature.

Visit any college or colegit website for working examples... Curriculum means syllabus, or set of courses In education, a curriculum (plural curricula) is the set of courses and their contents offered by an institution such as a school or university.

A crucial part of the curriculum is the definition of the course objectives which are often expressed in terms of learning outcomes and normally includes the assessment strategy for the program. These learning outcomes (and assessments) are often grouped into units and the curriculum, therefore, comprises a collection of such units, each specializing on a specific part of the curriculum. So a typical curriculum would include units on communications, numeracy, information technology, inter-personal skills together with more specialised provision. (m)

In education, a curriculum (plural curricula) is the set of courses and their contents offered by an institution such as a school or university. In some cases, a curriculum may be partially or entirely determined by an external body (such as the National Curriculum for England in English schools). In the U.S., the basic curriculum is established by each state with the individual school districts adjusting it to their desires. Each state however builds it curriculum relying heavily on the input of national groups selected by the Federal Dept of Education such as the [http://www.nctm.org National Council of Math Teachers. In Australia each state's Education Department sets the various curricula.

Note that the term curriculum may relate to the range of courses that students can select from (as defined above) but may also relate to a specific learning programme. In the latter context, the curriculum describes the collective teaching, learning and assessment materials that are available for that particular course.

A crucial part of the curriculum is the definition of the course objectives which are often expressed in terms of learning outcomes and normally includes the assessment strategy for the programme. These learning outcomes (and assessments) are often grouped into units (or modules) and the curriculum, therefore, comprises a collection of such units, each specialising on a specific part of the curriculum. So a typical curriculum would include units on communications, numeracy, information technology, inter-personal skills together with more specialised provision.

In K12, the curriculum's scope and sequence must be "mapped" against the scope and sequence of previous and subsequent years as well as against other subjects.

Source(s):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curriculum



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