What is the plural of spoonful, is it spoonsful, or spoonfuls ?



Answers:
The plural is spoonfuls. Most of the -ful words take an s at the end to form the plural.
Technically, the nursery rhyme probably should have been:
Sing a song of sixpence,
Pocketfuls of rye,
(I mean , who only carries around one pocket full of rye?)
but that wouldn't sound quite right.
id say spoonfuls?
Spoonsful is correct although many people use spoonfuls as it's easier to say
In my opinion, it should be spoonsful, as this relates to the number os spoons required. However, I think that the answer is spoonfuls... Spell checker says "spoonfuls" too!
Spoonsful... as in 'I would like three spoons full of sugar in my coffee please'
I say spoonfuls but i dnt no if it is right or not lol
As a single word, it is spoonfuls, however, as a phrase it can also properly be said spoons full. "This recipe requires three spoons full (of) butter."
Spoonfuls
It's Spoonfulls
Two alternatives are correct
spoons full
or
spoonfuls

For plurals the s, where it applies to make a plural, goes to the end of the word.
spoonful is a noun (as much as a spoon can hold) - so the plural would be formed by adding -s at the end - spoonfuls.

He put a spoonful of sugar in his coffee.

He put some spoonfuls of sugar in his coffe.

Hope this helps
Hello there,

The correct plural of spoonful is spoonfuls, not spoonsful. Alternatively, it would not necessarily be incorrect to use "spoons full", e.g. "give me two spoons full of sugar", but note that this requires using the two separate words "spoons" and "full", and would seem to imply two different spoons (two spoons, both of them full of sugar). Hope this helps:

Regards,

Crafty
Apparently the rules have changed on this one. I was taught spoonsful but the current dictionaries will accept either.
Think of it this way... which sounds better?

I used two spoonfuls of sugar in my tea.

or

I used two spoons full of sugar in my tea.

I think the first one sounds better. :)
Spoonfulls!
It is absolutely right to say Spoonsful, like it is right to say sisters-in-law., (if you ever want to talk about them but that's my problem - lol!!)

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